A 2020 Resolution to Unmask and Live Unapologetically and Authentically » The Aspergian

Wendy Katz has an inspiring, empowering, beautiful resolution mighty enough to last for a decade of work and revolutionary in its simplicity.Read More →

Source: A 2020 Resolution to Unmask and Live Unapologetically and Authentically » The Aspergian

Autism and manners — OldLady With Autism

Rude, thoughtless, cold, selfish, uncaring, intrusive, tactless, blundering, lacking insight, impulsive, crude, socially unacceptable, unkind, mean, pushy, can you add to this list of words? Have they been used to describe you? These and many more have been used to describe me over the years. I was hurt, shocked, and offended when told I was […]

Autism and manners — OldLady With Autism

Chicago school's staff threw 9-year-old into the cold and reported him missing, lawsuit says

Yvonne Pinkston said officials at Fiske Elementary School abused her son.

The family of a 9-year-old Chicago student sued the city’s school system this week, accusing staff members of manhandling the boy and forcing him out of the building in 40-degree weather without a coat.

Yvonne Pinkston, the boy’s mother, said officials at Fiske Elementary School on Chicago’s South Side threw her son out into the cold alone while only wearing short sleeves in March after he complained about being bullied by classmates, according to the lawsuit.

The Herbert Law Firm, which is representing the family, released surveillance video from the school, appearing to show a security guard dragging the boy into the principal’s office and then forcing the fourth-grader out of the building as the school’s counselor and principal watched from nearby.

“He went to all of the doors to see if they were open and all of the doors were locked … so he just sat there and he said he cried,” Pinkston told reporters Wednesday.

The family of a 9-year-old Chicago student sued the city’s school system this week, accusing staff members of abuse, harassment and discrimination.
via WLS

School staff eventually called 911 to request an ambulance, claiming the child, who was listed as K.S. in the suit, had been scratching, biting and kicking, according to the suit, which was filed on Monday. They also reported him missing, but the law firm said they fabricated the entire story.

“CPS officials at Fiske Elementary School lied to police after they shoved and pushed a nine-year-old boy onto the streets of Englewood, one of Chicago’s most violent neighborhoods, with no coat in cold weather during the middle of the school day and claimed he was a ‘missing person who was violent,'” the law firm said in a statement. “About 30 minutes later, police found the boy outside in the cold terrified and crying. The video shows that school officials lied.”

School staff eventually called 911 to request an ambulance, claiming the child, who was listed as K.S. in the suit, had been scratching, biting and kicking, according to the suit, which was filed on Monday. They also reported him missing, but the law firm said they fabricated the entire story.

“CPS officials at Fiske Elementary School lied to police after they shoved and pushed a nine-year-old boy onto the streets of Englewood, one of Chicago’s most violent neighborhoods, with no coat in cold weather during the middle of the school day and claimed he was a ‘missing person who was violent,'” the law firm said in a statement. “About 30 minutes later, police found the boy outside in the cold terrified and crying. The video shows that school officials lied.”

The video shows the boy wearing a short-sleeved shirt and khakis in temperatures barely above freezing.

“I feel like everybody in the video that just sat here and just let it happen, nobody stopped it, someone needs to go to jail for it or something,” Pinkston said. “That’s neglect. It’s endangerment. Anything could have happened to my son out there in that neighborhood.”

The lawsuit, which names the city, the board of education and three school officials as defendants, claims the child was subjected to a hostile educational environment and alleges battery, excessive force and intentional infliction of emotional distress.

The family of a 9-year-old Chicago student sued the city’s school system this week, accusing staff members of abuse, harassment and discrimination.The family of a 9-year-old Chicago student sued the city’s school system this week, accusing staff members of abuse, harassment and discrimination.via WLS

“K.S.’s experience at Fiske has left him with lasting, emotional wounds,” the lawsuit said. “K.S. sees a psychologist weekly to help him overcome the trauma he endured at the hands of the school administrators at Fiske.”

The family is requesting a jury trial.

The Chicago Public School Board said it was deeply disturbed by the claims levied by the family, but it declined to comment on the pending litigation.

“Every CPS student deserves access to a safe and welcoming school environment, and the district takes seriously all allegations of student harm,” a spokesperson said. “These allegations are deeply disturbing, and we are fully committed to holding accountable any adult whose actions could have endangered a student.”

The lawsuit comes as the school district grapples with several other lawsuits filed by parents, including one who accused teachers of bullying a fourth-grade special needs student relentlessly before he attempted suicide earlier this year.

Jamari Dent, 11, tried to hang himself in February after more than a year of chronic and violent bullying at the hands of students and staff members at two Chicago schools, according to a lawsuit filed in June. Dent, who attended Evers Elementary before transferring to Woodson Elementary, survived the Feb. 18 suicide attempt, but the incident left him with permanent brain damage and other life-threatening injuries.

The young boy’s mother, Tierra Black, said she begged teachers, school officials and the school district to protect her son, but her complaints were ignored.

The district said it launched “a full investigation” into Black’s “highly concerning” claims earlier this year.

Many young autistic people harm themselves, others

Nearly one-third of autistic young people put themselves or others in danger in any given three-month period, according to a new study1. And nearly one in four of these young people will not have seen a mental health professional in that time.

The study, which looked at autistic people aged 3 to 25 years, is based on a parent survey.

The researchers sent the survey to a large database of families with autistic children; only 7 percent (462 families) completed it. The results may overestimate the prevalence of these events because families who have experienced them are more likely to respond, says Luther Kalb, assistant professor of neuropsychology at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, Maryland, who led the biostatistical analysis.

The researchers adjusted their analysis to account for this bias. “It’s still common enough to warrant attention,” Kalb says.

In autistic children younger than 12, the incidents tend to be related to self-injury and to wandering or running away, the researchers found. In young people aged 12 to 25, the episodes more often involve physical and verbal aggression, usually aimed at parents.

The younger an autistic person is, and the lower her quality of life, as reported by a parent, the more likely she is to have one of these incidents. Poor language skills and having a mother with depression also increase a child’s chances of having an incident.

The findings were published in October in Autism Research.

The work may help parents and clinicians develop plans to preempt and manage dangerous behaviors in autistic children. “We can start identifying populations that may need more intervention than others,” Kalb says.

References:
  1. Vasa R.A. et al. Autism Res. Epub ahead of print (2019) PubMed

Originally published on Spectrum

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Chicago cop suspended after unarmed, autistic teen shot

CHICAGO — An off-duty Chicago police officer was suspended Thursday for six months after authorities say he shot an unarmed, autistic teen in 2017 on the city’s South Side.

The Chicago Police Board voted to suspend Sgt. Khalil Muhammad during an evening meeting, the Chicago Sun-Times and Chicago Tribune reported. The action stemmed from the August 2017 shooting of Ricardo Hayes, then 18, and police initially described it as an armed confrontation.

The ruling followed an agreement by Muhammad to plead guilty to several departmental charges, including unlawful or unnecessary display of a weapon, disobeying an order and failing to perform a duty. The Civilian Office of Police Accountability, which recommended the suspension, found Muhammad was not justified when he fired the shots.

Surveillance video released last year by the accountability office shows Muhammad shooting and wounding Hayes. That contradicted the earlier police description of an armed confrontation and echoed devastating dashcam video evidence against a white Chicago officer who claimed Laquan McDonald tried to stab him before he fatally shot the black teen.

Before the shooting, Hayes can be seen running along the sidewalk then stopping. Muhammad pulls up alongside, with parked cars between them. Hayes takes a few steps toward him and Muhammad shoots the teen in the arm and chest. Hayes turns and runs, despite his wounds.

The sergeant’s call to 911 after he shot Hayes also was released last year.

“The guy, like, he was about to pull a gun. Walked up to the car, and I had to shoot,” Muhammad told a Chicago Fire Department dispatcher. But according to the lawsuit filed by Hayes and his family, the teen “was standing almost perfectly still, facing Officer Muhammad’s truck, with his hands at his sides” when he was shot.

When the shooting happened, the police force was training officers on how to handle people with mental health issues. That training was prompted by a 2015 incident in which a police officer fatally shot a 55-year-old innocent bystander and teenager with a baseball bat who was suffering a mental health episode.

A police official said last year Muhammad hadn’t received the training at the time he shot Hayes.