Autism Acceptance Month Day#17 – Understanding when it is ok and when it is not ok

In 2018, NPR ran a series called “Abused and Betrayed” which highlighted the underreported statistics of sexual victimization against individuals with developmental disabilities. NPR found that individuals with developmental disabilities were at risk of sexual abuse at a rate of seven times higher than the general population. Many factors put individuals with developmental disabilities at risk for sexual abuse, including limited knowledge regarding healthy relationships and limited body autonomy.

In response to these alarming statistics presented in the NPR series, ASERT collaborated with the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center at the Medical University of South Carolina to develop the Be Safe Resource Collection. The goal of Be Safe is to increase the availability of knowledge and resources for individuals, caregivers, and professionals with the aim of prevention and intervention of sexual abuse and assault against individuals with autism.

To kick off this resource collection, ASERT created the Ask, Listen, Respect Pledge in 2018. ASERT called on family members, caregivers, and support staff to pledge that they will respect and promote the body autonomy of individuals they care for. Body autonomy is a right of all persons. It is the idea that individuals have a right to have a say about what happens to their bodies. This is especially important for individuals with developmental disabilities who may require support in self-care and daily living skills from family members, caregivers, and support staff. Promoting body autonomy is an essential first step to encouraging a positive and safe environment for all individuals.

The pledge focused on three important components. First, we will ASK an individual before touching them when providing support. Second, we will LISTEN to what the individual says and empower them to make choices about their body. Lastly, we will RESPECT the individual’s choice about their body. We also asked individuals to take the pledge by empowering individuals to make people ASK them for permission before providing physical assistance, LISTEN when they provide decisions about their body, and RESPECT their choice. In the second year of this campaign, we are asking individuals to recommit to this Ask, Listen, Respect pledge.

This year, ASERT will be promoting the Be Safe Resource Collection in honor of April’s Autism Awareness and Acceptance Month and Sexual Assault Awareness Month. The Be Safe Resource Collection aims to provide resources and knowledge to individuals, caregivers, and professionals about the prevention of sexual abuse and sexual assault of individuals with autism.

These resources provide information about the rates of sexual abuse and assault, as well as factors that increase risk for sexual abuse or assault. Resources also include tips on how to teach body awareness and body safety, information on teaching relationship building skills, and resources on how to identify and report abuse in children and adults. We have developed infographics, social stories, eLearning courses and other resource materials to make these concepts accessible for many audiences. For more information, check out the Be Safe Collection website www.paautism.org/besafe.

We encourage you to continue to the Ask, Listen, Respect Pledge! Click HERE to take the Ask, Listen, Respect Pledge and download the Pledge Card Today!

Autism Acceptance Month Day#17 – Understanding when it is ok and when it is not ok

In 2018, NPR ran a series called “Abused and Betrayed” which highlighted the underreported statistics of sexual victimization against individuals with developmental disabilities. NPR found that individuals with developmental disabilities were at risk of sexual abuse at a rate of seven times higher than the general population. Many factors put individuals with developmental disabilities at risk for sexual abuse, including limited knowledge regarding healthy relationships and limited body autonomy.

In response to these alarming statistics presented in the NPR series, ASERT collaborated with the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center at the Medical University of South Carolina to develop the Be Safe Resource Collection. The goal of Be Safe is to increase the availability of knowledge and resources for individuals, caregivers, and professionals with the aim of prevention and intervention of sexual abuse and assault against individuals with autism.

To kick off this resource collection, ASERT created the Ask, Listen, Respect Pledge in 2018. ASERT called on family members, caregivers, and support staff to pledge that they will respect and promote the body autonomy of individuals they care for. Body autonomy is a right of all persons. It is the idea that individuals have a right to have a say about what happens to their bodies. This is especially important for individuals with developmental disabilities who may require support in self-care and daily living skills from family members, caregivers, and support staff. Promoting body autonomy is an essential first step to encouraging a positive and safe environment for all individuals.

The pledge focused on three important components. First, we will ASK an individual before touching them when providing support. Second, we will LISTEN to what the individual says and empower them to make choices about their body. Lastly, we will RESPECT the individual’s choice about their body. We also asked individuals to take the pledge by empowering individuals to make people ASK them for permission before providing physical assistance, LISTEN when they provide decisions about their body, and RESPECT their choice. In the second year of this campaign, we are asking individuals to recommit to this Ask, Listen, Respect pledge.

This year, ASERT will be promoting the Be Safe Resource Collection in honor of April’s Autism Awareness and Acceptance Month and Sexual Assault Awareness Month. The Be Safe Resource Collection aims to provide resources and knowledge to individuals, caregivers, and professionals about the prevention of sexual abuse and sexual assault of individuals with autism.

These resources provide information about the rates of sexual abuse and assault, as well as factors that increase risk for sexual abuse or assault. Resources also include tips on how to teach body awareness and body safety, information on teaching relationship building skills, and resources on how to identify and report abuse in children and adults. We have developed infographics, social stories, eLearning courses and other resource materials to make these concepts accessible for many audiences. For more information, check out the Be Safe Collection website www.paautism.org/besafe.

We encourage you to continue to the Ask, Listen, Respect Pledge! Click HERE to take the Ask, Listen, Respect Pledge and download the Pledge Card Today!

Autism Acceptance Month – Day #5: Autism By The Numbers (Statewide)

Overview:

In 2004, the PA Autism Task Force noted that the number of individuals with autism spectrum disorder or “autism”
receiving services was unknown in Pennsylvania. In response, the PA Department of Human Services (DHS)
(formerly the Department of Public Welfare), Bureau of Autism Services (BAS) conducted the 2009 Pennsylvania
Autism Census to estimate the number of individuals with autism in the Commonwealth receiving services. The
findings of the original study informed service and program planning efforts in PA. In order to continue this work, BAS commissioned a Census Update. This document outlines the key findings of the 2014 Pennsylvania Autism
Census Update, which provides the most recent data on Pennsylvania’s population with autism.

Why does this matter?

Identifying individuals with autism who
are receiving services is important for
program planning for the state. Learn-
ing how many individuals with autism
are receiving services, as well as char-
acterizing their demographics and loca-
tion, helps with the design of effective
services.

Key Findings:

The 2009 Pennsylvania Autism Census Project identified nearly 20,000 Pennsylvanians with autism receiving
services. In the 2014 Pennsylvania Autism Census Update, that number has risen to over 55,000 children and adults in PA with autism receiving services. Data has shown that between the two time points, there was a 181% overall increase in the number of individuals with autism receiving services, and a 334% increase in adults 21+, making adults the fastest growing group.

High population areas coincide with high areas of individuals with autism receiving services. For example, Allegheny County has the
highest number of individuals, followed by Philadelphia County.

High population areas coincide with high areas of adults with autism receiving services. Knowing where there is a significant number of adults with autism
receiving services can help determine the best design for services, and inform policy and planning.

Of the latter, Fayette and Westmoreland Counties have a high presence of adults on the spectrum. Likewise, Westmoreland county had a much higher populace of individuals at the time. We will look into these two counties tomorrow